Small Business & Non-Profit Relief

UPDATE (7/8/2020): The Paycheck Protection Program has been REOPENED. Applications will be accepted until August 8. Please head to SBA.gov for more information.

The House of Representatives has taken historic action to protect small businesses through unprecedented legislation and relief programs as our country works through the COVID-19 pandemic.

Please find below extensive resources to help guide small business owners through the myriad options available.

Regional Small Business Administration Office
100 State Street Room 410
Rochester, NY 14614
585-263-6700

We understand that these are confusing times for small business owners. Please use the information below to answer some of your questions. Click the link to jump to that section.


 

Paycheck Protection Program Loans

PDF iconCLICK HERE for details on the Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act.

The Payment Protection Program provides cash-flow assistance through 100 percent federally guaranteed loans to employers who maintain their payroll during this emergency. If employers maintain their payroll, the loans would be forgiven, which would help workers remain employed, as well as help affected small businesses and our economy to snap-back quicker after the crisis. PPP has a host of attractive features, such as forgiveness of up to 8 weeks of payroll based on employee retention and salary levels, no SBA fees and at least six months of deferral with maximum deferrals of up to a year. Small businesses and other eligible entities will be able to apply if they were harmed by COVID-19 between February 15, 2020 and June 30, 2020. This program is would be retroactive to February 15, 2020, in order to help bring workers who may have already been laid off back onto payrolls. Loans are available through June 30, 2020.

Please use this resource from the United States Treasury to learn more about the PPP.

FAQs


What types of businesses and entities are eligible for a PPP loan?
Answer:

• Businesses and entities must have been in operation on February 15, 2020.
• Small business concerns, as well as any business concern, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, a 501(c)(19) veterans organization, or Tribal business concern described in section 31(b)(2)(C) that has fewer than 500 employees or fewer employees than established by the relevant industry code.
• Individuals who operate a sole proprietorship or as an independent contractor and eligible self-employed individuals.
• Any business concern that employs not more than 500 employees per physical location of the business concern and that is assigned a North American Industry Classification System code beginning with 72, for which the affiliation rules are waived.
• Affiliation rules are also waived for any business concern operating as a franchise that is assigned a franchise identifier code by the Administration, and company.


What are "affiliation rules"?
Answer:

They become important when SBA is deciding whether a business’s affiliations preclude them from being considered “small.” Generally, affiliation exists when one business controls or has the power to control another or when a third party (or parties) controls or has the power to control both businesses. Please see this resource for more on these rules and how they can impact your business’s eligibility.

What types of non-profits are eligible?
Answer:

All 501(c)(3) non-profits with 500 employees or fewer, or more if SBA’s size standards for the non-profit allows. Please visit https://www.sba.gov/size-standards/ to find out your non-profit’s SBA size standards by number of employees. For example, churches and museums with fewer than 500 employees are eligible. You will need the 6-digit North American Industry Classification Code for your business.

How is the loan size determined?
Answer:

Depending on your business’s situation, the loan size will be calculated in different ways (see below). The maximum loan size is always $10 million.
• If you were in business February 15, 2019 – June 30, 2019: Your max loan is equal to 250 percent of your average monthly payroll costs during that time period. If your business employs seasonal workers, you can opt to choose March 1, 2019 as your time period start date.
• If you were not in business between February 15, 2019 – June 30, 2019: Your max loan is equal to 250 percent of your average monthly payroll costs between January 1, 2020 and February 29, 2020.
• If you took out an Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) between February 15, 2020 and June 30, 2020 and you want to refinance that loan into a PPP loan, you would add the outstanding loan amount to the payroll sum.

What costs are eligible for payroll?
Answer:

• Compensation (salary, wage, commission, or similar compensation, payment of cash tip or equivalent)
• Payment for vacation, parental, family, medical, or sick leave
• Allowance for dismissal or separation
• Payment required for the provisions of group health care benefits, including insurance premiums
• Payment of any retirement benefit
• Payment of State or local tax assessed on the compensation of employees

What costs are not eligible for payroll?
Answer:

• Employee/owner compensation over $100,000
• Taxes imposed or withheld under chapters 21, 22, and 24 of the IRS code
• Compensation of employees whose principal place of residence is outside of the U.S
• Qualified sick and family leave for which a credit is allowed under sections 7001 and 7003 of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act


What are the allowable uses of loan proceeds?
Answer
:
• Payroll costs (as noted above)
• Costs related to the continuation of group health care benefits during periods of paid sick, medical, or family leave, and insurance premiums
• Employee salaries, commissions, or similar compensations (see exclusions above)
• Payments of interest on any mortgage obligation (which shall not include any prepayment of or payment of principal on a mortgage obligation)
• Rent (including rent under a lease agreement)
• Utilities
• Interest on any other debt obligations that were incurred before the covered period


What are the loan term, interest rate, and fees?
Answer:

The maximum term is 10 years, the maximum interest rate is 4 percent, zero loan fees, zero prepayment fee (SBA will establish application fees caps for lenders that charge).

How is the forgiveness amount calculated?
Answer:

Forgiveness on a covered loan is equal to the sum of the following payroll costs incurred during the covered 8 week period compared to the previous year or time period, proportionate to maintaining employees and wages (excluding compensation over $100,000):
• Payroll costs plus any payment of interest on any covered mortgage obligation (not including any prepayment or payment of principal on a covered mortgage obligation) plus any payment on any covered rent obligation plus and any covered utility payment.

How do I get forgiveness on my PPP loan?
Answer:

You must apply through your lender for forgiveness on your loan. In this application, you must include:
• Documentation verifying the number of employees on payroll and pay rates, including IRS payroll tax filings and State income, payroll and unemployment insurance filings
• Documentation verifying payments on covered mortgage obligations, lease obligations, and utilities.
• Certification from a representative of your business or organization that is authorized to certify that the documentation provided is true and that the amount that is being forgiven was used in accordance with the program’s guidelines for use.

What happens after the forgiveness period?
Answer:

Any loan amounts not forgiven at the end of one year is carried forward as an ongoing loan with max terms of 10 years, at 4% max interest. Principal and interest will continue to be deferred, for a total of 6 months to a year after disbursement of the loan. The clock does not start again.

Can I get more than one PPP loan?
Answer:

No, an entity is limited to one PPP loan. Each loan will be registered under a Taxpayer Identification Number at SBA to prevent multiple loans to the same entity.

What kind of lender can I get a PPP loan from?
Answer:

All current SBA 7(a) lenders (see more about 7(a) here) are eligible lenders for PPP. The Department of Treasury will also be in charge of authorizing new lenders, including non-bank lenders, to help meet the needs of small business owners.

How does the PPP loan coordinate with SBA’s existing loans?
Answer:

Borrowers may apply for PPP loans and other SBA financial assistance, including Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDLs), 7(a) loans, 504 loans, and microloans, and also receive investment capital from Small Business Investment Corporations (SBICs).

How does the PPP loan work with the temporary Emergency Economic Injury Grants and the Small Business Debt Relief program?
Answer:

Emergency Economic Injury Grant recipients and those who receive loan payment relief through the Small Business Debt Relief Program may apply for and take out a PPP loan. Refer to those sections for more information.


Small Business Debt Relief Program

This program will provide immediate relief to small businesses with non-disaster SBA loans, in particular 7(a), 504, and microloans. Under it, SBA will cover all loan payments on these SBA loans, including principal, interest, and fees, for six months. This relief will also be available to new borrowers who take out loans within six months of the President signing the bill into law.

FAQs

Which SBA loans are eligible for debt relief under this program?
Answer:

7(a) loans not made under the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), 504 loans, and microloans. Disaster loans are not eligible (see Economic Injury Disaster Loans below for more information on these).

How does debt relief under this program work with a PPP loan?
Answer:

Borrowers may separately apply for and take out a PPP loan, but debt relief under this program will not apply to a PPP loan.

How do I know if I’m eligible for a 7(a), 504, or microloan?
Answer:

In general, businesses must meet size standards, be based in the U.S., be able to repay, and have a sound business purpose. Each program has different requirements, see https://www.sba.gov/funding-programs/loans for more details.

What is a 7(a) loan and how do I apply?
Answer:

7(a) loans are an affordable loan product of up to $5 million for borrowers who lack credit elsewhere and need access to versatile financing, providing short-term or long-term working capital and to purchase an existing business, refinance current business debt, or purchase furniture, fixtures and supplies. In the program, banks share a portion of the risk of the loan with SBA. There are many different types of 7(a) loans, you can visit this site to find the one that’s best for you. You apply for a 7(a) loan with a bank or a mission-based lender. SBA has a free referral service tool called Lender Match to help find a lender near you.

What is a 504 loan and how do I apply?
Answer:

The 504 Loan Program provides loans of up to $5.5 million to approved small businesses with long-term, fixed-rate financing used to acquire fixed assets for expansion or modernization. It is a good option if you need to purchase real estate, buildings, and machinery. You apply through a Certified Development Company, which is a nonprofit corporation that promotes economic development. SBA has a free referral service tool called Lender Match to help find a lender near you.

What is a microloan and how do I apply?
Answer:

The Microloan Program provides loans up to $50,000 to help small businesses and certain not-for-profit childcare centers to start up and expand. The average microloan is about $13,000. These loans are delivered through mission-based lenders who are also able to provide business counseling. SBA has a free referral service tool called Lender Match to help find a microlender near you.

I am unfamiliar with SBA loans, can anyone help me apply?
Answer:

Yes, SBA resource partners are available to help guide you through the loan application process. You can find your nearest Small Business Development Center (SBDC) or Women’s Business Center here.


Economic Injury Disaster Loans & Emergency Economic Injury Grants

These grants provide an emergency advance of up to $10,000 to small businesses and private non-profits harmed by COVID-19 within three days of applying for an SBA Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL). To access the advance, you must first apply for an EIDL and then request the advance. The advance does not need to be repaid under any circumstance, and may be used to keep employees on payroll, to pay for sick leave, meet increased production costs due to supply chain disruptions, or pay business obligations, including debts, rent and mortgage payments.

FAQ

Are businesses and private non-profits in my state eligible for an EIDL related to COVID-19?
Answer:

Yes, those suffering substantial economic injury in all 50 states, DC, and the territories may apply for an EIDL.

What is an EIDL and what is it used for?
Answer:

EIDLs are lower interest loans of up to $2 million, with principal and interest deferment available for up to 4 years, that are available to pay for expenses that could have been met had the disaster not occurred, including payroll and other operating expenses.

Who is eligible for an EIDL?
Answer:

Those eligible are the following with 500 or fewer employees:
• Small business concerns (including sole proprietorships, with or without employees)
• Independent contractors
• Cooperatives and employee-owned businesses
• Private non-profits
• Tribal small businesses

My private non-profit is not a 501(c)(3). Is it still eligible for an EIDL and a grant?
Answer:

Yes, if you are a private non-profit with an effective ruling letter from the IRS, granting tax exemption under sections 501(c), (d), or (e) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, or if you can provide satisfactory evidence from the State that the non-revenue producing organization or entity is a non-profit one organized or doing business under State law.

Who is eligible for an Emergency Economic Injury Grant?
Answer:

Those eligible for an EIDL and who have been in operation since January 31, 2020.

How long are Emergency Economic Injury Grants available?
Answer:

January 31, 2020 – December 31, 2020. The grants are backdated to January 31, 2020 to allow those who have already applied for EIDLs to be eligible to also receive a grant.

If I get an EIDL and/or an Emergency Economic Injury Grant, can I get a PPP loan?
Answer:

Whether you’ve already received an EIDL unrelated to COVID-19 or you receive a COVID-19 related EIDL and/or Emergency Grant between January 31, 2020 and June 30, 2020, you may also apply for a PPP loan. If you ultimately receive a PPP loan or refinance an EIDL into a PPP loan, any advance amount received under the Emergency Economic Injury Grant Program would be subtracted from the amount forgiven in the PPP.

How do I know if my business is a small business?
Answer:

Please visit https://www.sba.gov/size-standards/ to find out if your business meets SBA’s small business size standards. You will need the 6-digit North American Industry Classification Code for your business and your business’ 3-year average annual revenue.

How do I apply for an economic injury disaster loan?
Answer:

To apply for an EIDL online, please visit https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela/. Your SBA Regional Office is an important resource when applying for SBA assistance.

I am unfamiliar with the EIDL process, can anyone help me apply?
Answer:

Yes, SBA resource partners are available to help guide you through the EIDL application process. You can find the nearest Small Business Development Center (SBDC), Women’s Business Center, or SCORE mentorship chapter at https://www.sba.gov/local-assistance/find/.


As part of The Families First Coronavirus Response Act  passed into law on March 18  the federal government expanded access to emergency paid sick leave and paid family leave to roughly 87 million Americans. This is to ensure no one feels the burden of leaving work if they feel symptomatic or to take care of a loved on. Please consult the Frequently Asked Questions below to see what employees are entitled to, as well as how employers are impacted and made whole. You can also find more information on this provision from the Department of Labor here and the House Appropriations Committee here.

FAQ

When does the law go into effect?

Answer: Employers have until April 2, 2020 to come into compliance with the provisions of the bill.

 

What size business do these provisions apply to?

Answer: Employers with fewer than 500 employees must adhere to the emergency paid sick and paid family leave requirements.

 

Will my business be hurt by having to pay these funds?

Answer: NO. While businesses front the money to employees for these provisions, employers will be fully reimbursed for this program.

 

Question: What are employees entitled to?

Answer: Employees who cannot work or telework due to COVID-19 related circumstances are entitled to 10 days (80 hours) of paid sick leave and 12 weeks of paid family leave. How much money employees receive can depend on if they are full-time or part-time  visit this link to find see how much employees are eligible for.

 

Question: Are hourly workers covered?

Answer: YES. Part-time employees are covered to the extent that their employer is mandated to provide leave. For emergency sick leave, part-time employees are entitled to the typical numbers of hours that they work in a typical two-week period.  

 

Question: Will tax credits help defray the costs for employers?

Answer: YES. Both the paid sick leave and paid family leave provisions provide for a refundable payroll tax credit to employers to cover 100 percent of the cost of wages and health insurance premiums paid during the leave.

 

Question: When will employers receive this tax credit?

Answer: The credit is through payroll tax, therefore employers will receive the credit immediately, instead of making their full payroll tax deposits.

 

Question: Are sole-proprietors/self-employed workers or those in the gig economy eligible for the tax credit?

Answer: YES. The legislation ensures that self-employed and gig economy workers receive the credit. For the days they cannot work, they can claim a tax credit of up to $200 a day, for up to ten days; or their average daily self-employment income, for up to ten days—whichever is lower.  

 

Question: When will self-employed and gig economy workers receive this tax credit?

Answer: They will receive the credit immediately by reducing their estimated quarterly tax payments.

 


Counseling and Navigation

If you, like many small business owners, need a business counselor to help guide you through this uncertain time, you can turn to your local Small Business Development Center (SBDC), Women’s Business Center (WBC), or SCORE mentorship chapter. These resource partners, and the associations that represent them, will receive additional funds to expand their reach and better support small business owners with counseling and up-to-date information regarding COVID-19. There will soon be a joint platform that consolidates information and resources related to COVID-19 in order to provide consistent, timely information to small businesses. To find a local resource partner, visit https://www.sba.gov/local-assistance/find/.
In addition, the Minority Business Development Agency’s Business Centers (MBDCs), which cater to minority business enterprises of all sizes, will also receive funding to hire staff and provide programming to help their clients respond to COVID-19. Not every state has a MBDC. To find out if there is one that services your area, visit this site.

FAQs

Do I have to pay for counseling and training through SBDCs, WBCs, and MBDCs?
Answer:

Counseling is free and training is low-cost with these partners. The additional funds that Congress provided will help keep this possible. Mentorship through SCORE is always free.

What is a SBDC?
Answer:

SBDCs are a national network of nearly 1,000 centers that are located at leading universities, colleges, state economic development agencies and private partners. They provide counseling and training to new and existing businesses. Each state has a lead center that coordinates services specifically for that state, which you can find by clicking the link above. To find out more about SBDCs, visit https://americassbdc.org/about-us/.

What is a WBC; is it only for women?
Answer:

WBCs are a national network of more than 100 centers that offer one-on-one counseling, training, networking, workshops, technical assistance and mentoring to entrepreneurs on numerous business development topics. In addition to women, WBCs are mandated to serve the needs of underserved entrepreneurs, including low-income entrepreneurs. They often offer flexible hours to meet the needs of their diverse clientele. To find out more about WBCs, visit https://www.awbc.org.

What is SCORE?
Answer:

SCORE provides free, confidential business advice through our volunteer network of 10,000+ business experts. You can meet with a mentor online. Find out more here.

Who do MBDCs serve?
Answer:

MBDCs are a good option for minority-owned businesses (including those owned by Black, Hispanic, Asian American/Pacific Islander, and American Indian business owners), especially those seeking to penetrate new markets — domestic & global — and grow in size and scale.


Essential Business

Businesses within essential service industries are exempt from these reductions, including: shipping, media, warehousing, grocery and food production, pharmacies, healthcare providers, utilities, banks and related financial institutions, and other industries critical to the supply chain. If you feel your business is considered "essential," fill out this form electronically and send to: covid19designations@esd.ny.gov


Where can I help?

Is your business able to help out?

If you feel your business may be able to offer services, space, staffing, or other resources to the COVID-19 pandemic, please contact COVID19supplies@esd.ny.gov


FEMA Resources

Donations

  • Cash donations to the non-profit of your choice IS THE BEST donation.
  • You can find vetted non-profit organizations supporting COVID-19 response efforts at www.NVOAD.org.
  • If you have medical supplies or equipment to donate, please email FEMA’s National Business Emergency Operations Center at nbeoc@fema.dhs.gov.

Volunteering

  • Trained medical volunteers can offer their services by registering with a National VOAD member on www.NVOAD.org. Please BE PATIENT. You will be contacted once resources are matched with unmet needs.
  • Adequate supplies of blood are needed to treat patients in hospitals, but many blood drives have been canceled. Donating blood is a safe process, and blood donation centers have the highest standards of safety and infection control. To find where you can donate blood, visit redcross.org.

Companies With Medical Supplies, Equipment and Services

  • To sell medical supplies or equipment to the federal government, please email specifics to nbeoc@fema.dhs.gov. · You can also register through the System for Award Management (SAM) website. All companies desiring to do business with the federal government must register, at no cost, with SAM.
  • For non-medical supplies, services or equipment, if you are interested in doing business with FEMA, visit our Industry Liaison Program.